Development Studies Need Social Engagement!

By Elisabetta Basile and Isa Baud

Redefining Development Studies is necessary for two reasons. First, the complexity and urgency of world development problems require direct assumption of responsibility from the Development Studies community. This implies that scholars and practitioners explicitly engage in exploring problems and solutions in partnership with the communities and policymakers involved. Second, an epistemological and ontological change in Development Studies is required. Emerging development interests and the needs of multiple actors lead to new research approaches, themes and priorities, requiring new forms of knowledge and involving several disciplines in research. Continue reading “Development Studies Need Social Engagement!”

Will the Future EU Budget Water Down the Consensus on Poverty Reduction and Sustainable Development?

By Amelia Hadfield and Simon Lightfoot

The European Union (EU)’s draft Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2021-27 is currently under negotiation. If approved, the EU’s development cooperation budget would increase by 30% despite Brexit. Given the possible political sensitivities around these discussions, the most recent peer review of the EU’s plans by the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) did not swerve the issue and made a number of recommendations relating to the political context of the MFF negotiations. Continue reading “Will the Future EU Budget Water Down the Consensus on Poverty Reduction and Sustainable Development?”

Social Transfers: A Corner-Stone for Human, Economic and Political Development

By Markus Loewe and Christoph Strupat
(Image by UNICEF Malawi)

It is common wisdom that social transfer schemes are an important instrument of poverty reduction and human development. But evidence is increasing that fair and generous social transfer schemes are also important for economic growth and political stability. Continue reading “Social Transfers: A Corner-Stone for Human, Economic and Political Development”

Why We Need Alternatives to Development

By Ashish Kothari, Ariel Salleh, Arturo Escobar, Federico Demaria, and Alberto Acosta

The seductive nature of development rhetoric, sometimes called developmentality or developmentalism, has been internalized across virtually all countries. Decades after the notion of development spread around the world, only a handful of countries that were called ‘underdeveloped’ or ‘developing’, now really qualify as ‘developed’. Others struggle to emulate the North’s economic template, and all at enormous ecological and social cost. The problem lies not in lack of implementation, but in the conception of development as linear, unidirectional, material and financial growth, driven by commodification and capitalist markets. Continue reading “Why We Need Alternatives to Development”

Development Studies Matter! Framing an Evolving Field of Study in Changing Times

By Susanne von Itter

EADI has published a definition of Development Studies? Why yet another definition? Can such a broad field of studies be defined anyway? EADI finds: Yes!

“Development Studies (also known as ‘international development studies’ or ‘international development’) is a multi- and inter-disciplinary field of study rather than a single discipline. It seeks to understand the interplay between social, economic, political, technological, ecological, cultural and gendered aspects of societal change at the local, national, regional and global levels.”

Continue reading “Development Studies Matter! Framing an Evolving Field of Study in Changing Times”