After the Landslide: What are the Prospects for UK-EU Collaboration in Global Development Cooperation?

By Andrew Sherriff and Andy Sumner / Part of the European Development Policy Outlook Series

So, the UK has a new government. What does it mean for post-Brexit UK-EU relations?

In a new brief for ECDPM, we consider the UK election outcome and explore the potential challenges and opportunities for UK-EU collaboration on development.

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Power Dynamics are Everywhere, and Language is no Exception

We can talk in English, but can we talk about English?

By Basile Boulay (part 3 of 3)

Facilitating publication in English for non-native speakers is important: as we saw in the previous post (1st post here), they face numerous entry barriers that prevent them for having the same chances as their native peers on the ‘research market’. It’s not the full story, however, and far from it. In this third article, I would like to stress how far this linguistic divide takes us on the terrain of structural inequalities, power dynamics, and, yes, intellectual reductionism. Although we cannot ignore the practical gains that English as a lingua franca brings for research, we can’t turn a blind eye to the fact that this hegemony creates serious problems for everyone, native speakers included.

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The Daily Multi-Layered Barriers Faced by Non-Native English Researchers

We can talk in English, but can we talk about English?

By Basile Boulay (part 2 of 3)

In this second of three blogposts on the linguistic predominance of English in research (first one here), I explore the variety of ‘everyday’ barriers faced by researchers whose first language is not English when producing, presenting and/or publishing their findings in this language. The focus here is on the immediate issues they face in the current context, and potential solutions. The deeper considerations of political economy and power will be the subject of the third, final blogpost.

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Money, Ministries, Motives, and Meh: How Might the Election Change UK Development Policy?

By Andy Sumner / Part of the European Development Policy Outlook Series

The UK election is at hand. The campaign has been dominated by questions of what might change in the UK (or not). But there’s been relatively little attention on overseas and specifically, foreign and development policy. What are the main political parties pledging?

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We Can Talk in English, but Can We Talk about English?

Social science Research and Linguistic Predominance

By Basile Boulay (part 1 of 3)

The 50th anniversary of EADI is a good opportunity to reflect on the multiple evolutions of Development Studies, and social sciences more generally, over the past decades. Through this series of three blogposts, I would like to open a space for discussion and reflection on the issue of languages and epistemic communities. The growing predominance of English has imposed a radical change on the academic landscape; a change so profound that many non-native English speakers in academia barely question this linguistic hegemony, while native speakers themselves are often unaware of its effects.

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