We Can Talk in English, but Can We Talk about English?

Social science Research and Linguistic Predominance

By Basile Boulay (part 1 of 3)

The 50th anniversary of EADI is a good opportunity to reflect on the multiple evolutions of Development Studies, and social sciences more generally, over the past decades. Through this series of three blogposts, I would like to open a space for discussion and reflection on the issue of languages and epistemic communities. The growing predominance of English has imposed a radical change on the academic landscape; a change so profound that many non-native English speakers in academia barely question this linguistic hegemony, while native speakers themselves are often unaware of its effects.

Continue reading “We Can Talk in English, but Can We Talk about English?”

Unravelling the Geographies of the Green Transition: Understanding the Finance-Extraction-Transitions Nexus 

By Tobias Franz and Angus McNelly

The transition from fossil fuels to green energy in the 21st century – driven by the urgent need to address anthropogenic climate change – represents a monumental shift in not just global energy systems but generally within global capitalism. This transition mirrors historical transformations in energy systems, such as the emergence of fossil capital in northern England or the shift from coal to oil in the 20th century, which have had profound impacts on the world economy. The ongoing green transition presents similar unique challenges and opportunities, requiring a fundamental reconfiguration of energy production and consumption patterns to avoid catastrophic climate collapse.

Continue reading “Unravelling the Geographies of the Green Transition: Understanding the Finance-Extraction-Transitions Nexus “

The Netherlands: a Bleak Perspective for Development Cooperation

By Lau Schulpen / Part of the European Development Policy Outlook Series

June 2024 is more than six months since the last general elections were held. Elections in which the radical right Party for Freedom (PVV) of Geert Wilders emerged as the biggest with 37 seats of the 150 in the Dutch lower house. It took the full six months for the PVV and three other right-wing parties to form a coalition government, meaning the Netherlands will have the most right-leaning government they ever had. For those still trying to cope with the blow of the PVV victory six months ago, and certainly for those who care about the world outside of the Netherlands, the new cabinet will have little to offer.

Continue reading “The Netherlands: a Bleak Perspective for Development Cooperation”

Swedish Aid Cuts Dent ‘Decades of Work’ in Global South

By Marta Paterlini

Cuts to Sweden’s overseas aid budget have undermined decades of work building research partnerships in the global South, according to researchers.

The Swedish government more than halved its overseas aid budget in 2023 and this was followed by stringent cuts to development research funding. Ministers cited the war in Ukraine among other factors behind the cuts.

Continue reading “Swedish Aid Cuts Dent ‘Decades of Work’ in Global South”

Aid Business as Usual? How Austria’s Development Cooperation has, so far, Dodged the Populist Bullet

By Lukas Schlögl / Part of the European Development Policy Outlook Series

Austria plays an unassuming midfield position in international development cooperation: stable institutions, a stagnant budget, incremental policy change and a multilateralist orientation. Taking a step back, such ‘aid business as usual’ is surprising. Why, despite tumultuous domestic political change and a strong political influence of right-wing populism, has Austria’s development cooperation remained shielded from politicisation? And: will this last?

Continue reading “Aid Business as Usual? How Austria’s Development Cooperation has, so far, Dodged the Populist Bullet”