Imagining Global Development Policy after 2030: What is the EU’s Role and How Will it Sit with Competing Geo-Political Paradigms?

By Andy Sumner and Stephan Klingebiel / Part of the European Development Policy Outlook Series

The EU has been particularly important in championing Agenda 2030 and keeping the SDGs on the global development policy agenda. What should happen after the deadline passes?

Development won’t end in 2030. Even if – what is extremely unlikely – the headline SDGs were met, at least a billion people would live just above extreme poverty. What are the options for a unifying framework after 2030, and what should the EU’s role be amid competing geo-political paradigms on global development.

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EADI at Fifty: Time for Looking Back and Understanding the Sea Change of World History

By Jürgen Wiemann

This year, 2024, global peace, prosperity and the environment are threatened by a cumulation of geopolitical crises, and we do not know yet whether this will lead to a final breakdown of international cooperation and more wars, or whether it will be possible to turn history around towards a brighter future. Looking back at the half century since EADI’s foundation in 1974 may help us to understand how we have arrived at this dramatic moment.  

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Rethinking Indigeneity

By María Fernanda Córdova Suxo

The Indigenous subject has been positioned as a key player in alternatives to development. These alternatives refer to Indigenous People’s struggles and knowledge as distinct ways of facing current crises – including environmental, food, and capitalist crises. This positioning can be interpreted as a result of different indigenous movements working together across borders, in search of self-determination and the fulfillment of their human rights. However, this indigenous subject, within academia and other spheres from which power emerges, tends to be framed in abstract characteristics and is dissociated from the complexity of its context. Therefore, the evocation of indigeneities does not necessarily correspond to the stance that these groups currently demonstrate.

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EADI @ 50 Years: Celebrating Why Researching and Studying Development Matters

By Laura Camfield and Andy Sumner

EADI will celebrate its 50th anniversary from April 2024 to September 2025. It was founded in 1975 in Linz, Austria, after a meeting of researchers the year before in Ghent, Belgium. Those researchers wanted to ‘promote a concerted approach to the gaps and shortcomings in research on development problems.‘

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Medical Drones in Africa: A Gamechanger for the Continent’s ‘Ailing’ Health Sector?

By Edwin Ambani Ameso and Gift Mwonzora

While medical drones can be lauded as game-changing health technologies that help save lives, and usher efficiency and cost-effectiveness in the often contextualized as fragile African health systems, Edwin Ambani Ameso and Gift Mwonzora argue that this is not the complete picture.

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